Saturday, April 4
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The Communist Holiday History today

The Communist Holiday History today

Main History
"I'm literally a communist, you idiot!" These were words that the inexplicably omnipresent commentator Ash Sarkar uttered in a television discussion with Piers Morgan, a man who is said to have civilized conversations about what David Irving is historical evidence of. Given that the intellectual temperature of today's public commentators can be measured in single-digit Kelvin, I think it is unlikely that even self-proclaimed "literal communists" are aware of the depth of brainwashing and bloodshed that took place to form the still image nominally communist giant that is China today. If a Damascene conversion to such intellectual rigor were imminent, the sofa preachers could do worse during the day than record Richard Davenport-Hines & # 39; excellent ed...
Pause for thought | History today

Pause for thought | History today

Main History
Susan P. Matterns The slow moon is climbing begins with the example of 12th century Hoelun, the mother of Chinggis Khan, whose story in the The secret history of the Mongols. In exile and widowhood, Hoelun and her seven children survived by sneaking, planning revenge, and gathering support for the subsequent conquest of much of Asia by the Mongols. If the results of her influence were brutal, it was still important that her most important contributions come after the birth of her children. As Mattern notes, Hoelun's life and the offspring that followed made her one of the “most biologically successful women” in history. The slow moon is climbing is much more than a story about how menopause was understood as "hormonal chaos". It is a sustainable argument about the nature
Friends in high places History today

Friends in high places History today

Main History
In the past decade, interest in the personal behind the political in relation to America's legislative landscape has increased in the 19th century. This study with two of the country's most active politicians is a very good example of the value of this approach. Much more than a traditional biography, Breast friends spotlights the long and sometimes very close friendship of William Rufus King from Alabama and James Buchanan from Pennsylvania, a friendship that crossed the increasingly inconsistent sections of Antebellum America and lasted until King's death at the relatively young age of 67. Just six weeks before his death in the spring of 1853, King had become Vice President of the United States, the sole holder of this office from Alabama. Buchanan, who became president (...
A strange pantheon History today

A strange pantheon History today

Main History
After the mammoth attempt of his master's biography of Winston Churchill, Andrew Roberts relaxes with this short collection of essays - possibly modeled on Churchill's own series "Great Contemporaries". The volume, which was created as a series of lectures, gives the impression of a light snack that is torn away before Roberts begins the main meal of his next big book. His choice of topics is varied, if not eccentric. He avoids ancient titans like Alexander and Caesar and begins with Napoleon - about whom he has already written an admirable biography - and closes with Margaret Thatcher. Given that Thatcher's only experience in warfare was to send a task force to the Falkland Islands, frankly, their inclusion here is absurd. Another strange choice is the American ...
Siberia's surprising history of music history today

Siberia's surprising history of music history today

Main History
When Sergei Volkonsky was exiled to Siberia in December 1825, his wife Maria volunteered to him. Her devotion was only surpassed by her strong will when she insisted on taking her clavichord, the unwieldy instrument that sled over 4,000 miles. The instrument was first placed in her husband's prison cell and later played in Maria's music salon in Irkutsk. Somewhat unbelievable that exiles educated there in deepest Siberia created a pulsating bourgeois life (Maria made the construction of a concert hall and the musical education in schools her personal projects) and transformed Irkutsk into the "Paris of Siberia". Like so many instruments, her clavichord would be lost in the tumult of later Russian history. Maria's story turns the idea of ​​Siberia upside down as a
Who is the purest of them all?

Who is the purest of them all?

Main History
David D. Hall has devoted his career to restoring the reputation of the religious sensitivity of the first English migrants to New England. His first book, The Faithful Shepherd: A History of the Ministry of New England in the 17th Century (1972) reported the lives of the ministers who joined migration in the 1630s and explicitly defended them against allegations that they had put unpleasant beliefs on the population. His most famous work, Worlds of wonder, days of judgment (1989) found that New England's religion had popular appeal beyond ministerial restrictions. Hall's Puritan New England was a land of deep faith and shared commitment to a religious vision of an improved society. The controversy that rocked the settlements in the first decade - like the one that led to the e...
The magic is gone History today

The magic is gone History today

Main History
Most of the intended readers of Michael Hunter's provocative and enjoyable new study will immediately recognize the allusion in its title. In 1971 - and it is hoped that someone is already thinking about ways to celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of its publication - Sir Keith Thomas produced one of the most influential early modern books on 20th century cultural history. Religion and the decline of magic was a comprehensive survey and often brilliant analysis of forms and patterns of mentality that had previously received little attention from "serious" academic historians: witchcraft, belief in ghosts and fairies, demonic possessions, astrology, magical healing, omens and prophecies. Thomas's accomplishment was to convincingly explain the social functions and i...
Ralegh in his time | History today

Ralegh in his time | History today

Main History
Allan Gallay's extensively researched, but above all profound biography of Walter Ralegh makes it unlikely that another, if any, will be published soon. The scope is ambitious, and if he attributes Ralegh to the spirit of British imperialism in America, he doesn't do much. It helps that his subject was the epitome of the Renaissance man, both a courtier of refined sensibility and an adventurer of bold and limitless ambition. The book is also bold in the context of the collapsing intellectual integrity of the humanities in the American Academy, which is slavishly reflected in Britain. When evaluating Ralegh, Gallay writes too many biographers: have taken holduring sticks of sand, so caught up in their own cultural concerns that they couldn't tell if he was a hero or a servan...